A site by
West By Northwest.org
Spencer Creek Storybook

Why I Love My Mother

by Lois Barton on March 20th, 2009 - 17:32:23

In the summer, we too often hear tragic stories about children, (and adults), drowning. Here is a cautionary tale that celebrates a good ending to a scary event. May it help you have a safer summer.

This is a story about motherhood. It involves a six year old and parents who separated several years ago. The child lives with her mother and sees her father only now and then because he lives miles away.

"On the last day of school this spring Dad picked me up at school and took me to his home where I visited for most of a week. I missed my mom and was glad when she came for me Sunday morning. I was scheduled to participate in a "horse camp" the next week, but it didn’t start till Monday morning, so Mom and I had the whole day together before she left me with my riding teacher."

"Mom and I visited friends for a bit but it was a sunny warm day and I wanted to play in the water. We checked for a suitable place along the nearby river without finding any thing that would work."

"After a while we came to a park on the bank of a smaller stream near the horse camp place."

"Mom was getting over a cold and didn’t want to go in the water. She stretched out on a bench a few feet away beside the water and in the sun."

"I found a stick for a pretend fishing pole. With my shoes off I waded into a shallow rocky place at the edge of the creek. I was talking to the fish as I played, absorbed in my small world. There were pretty rocks under a little water and a few minnows swimming among them. I told the little fish there was no hook on my pole so they didn’t need to be afraid."

"I sometimes slapped the water and watched the minnows dart away. I looked at Mom and wondered if she was asleep. Her eyes were shut."

"I leaned over to pick up a shiny red rock and dropped my fishing pole. Oh, no! I reached out to grab it before it floated away and fell into the water. It was deeper there and before I could get on my feet I began to float down stream. I couldn’t reach the bottom with my feet and floated bobbing along up and down."

"The tone of my talk with the fish changed, taking on a worried note. Mother heard the change and saw me floating by. She got off the bench, shed her wool jacket with cell phone,. car keys and wallet, and came to get me, diving into the water with all the rest of her clothes on."

Soon she had me piggyback with my arms around her neck. The water was really deep there, with a steep rock bank we could hardly get up. But we finally made it. I love my mother. I even told her so as we climbed out."

Copyright �2008 by Lois Barton

Writer and historian
Lois Barton

Lois Barton is a 90 year old mother of eight children. She has lived on the same rural acreage just south of Eugene, Oregon for more than 50 years. All their children learned to milk, to keep the woodboxes filled, to do their share of household and garden chores. Her first book, Spencer Butte Pioneers, was published in 1982 when her youngest started to school. Since then she wrote five other books: Daughter of the Soil, now out of print; One Woman's West; A Quaker Promise Kept; and Through My Window, autobiographical sketches, sequel to Daughter Of the Soil. Through the years Lois has been a 4H leader, president of the neighborhood association, a precinct committee woman, election board clerk, editor of the Lane County Historian, and a life-long Quaker. She spent a month in Southeast Asia in 1974 as a member of a church peace mission, after working for ten years as director of the Eugene Chapter of the World Without War Council.
Follow the links of the Voices of Spencer Creek for the most recent articles by Lois Barton, including:



Spencer Creek Storybook: Remembering Mother's Day at the Longhouse, and Not Up, Up and Away

Spencer Creek Storybook: A Rainbow Quilt, and Maple Syrup?

The Sunnyside of Spencer Butte: Inventing a Word for Trauma: Adrien Niyongabo and the Trauma Healing and Reconcilliation Service with Helen Park

The Sunnyside of Spencer Butte: Musings on a Trans-gender Friend

Prisons and Peacemaking: An Interview with Helen Park

The Sunnyside of Spencer Butte: A Tuba Christmas and The King's Carolers

Three Tales for the Wintertide: Of Dragons and Dreams

The Sunnyside of Spencer Butte: A Visit to Malheur National Wildlife Refuge

The Sunnyside of Spencer Butte: Frank and the Rivers

The Sunnyside of Spencer Butte: My Friend Peg and the Peaceful Good Fight

The Sunnyside of Spencer Butte: These Stones Are Speaking

The Sunnyside of Spencer Butte: Lucy McIver, Peace Pole Artist

The Sunnyside of Spencer Butte: Telephones, Then and Now

The Sunnyside of Spencer Butte: Remembering Bovine Tuberculosis

The Sunnyside of Spencer Butte: What Is a Quilt?

The Sunnyside of Spencer Butte: Quakers in the British Virgin Islands

The Sunnyside of Spencer Butte: Manta Rays, and Dandelions, A Poem, also introducing Carolann Krohn

The Sunnyside of Spencer Butte: Those Husky Macadamia Nuts

The Sunnyside of Spencer Butte: Fender's Blue, a Nine Day Wonder

The Sunnyside of Spencer Butte: Frannie and the Arrow

The Sunnyside of Spencer Butte: Bhavia's Cambodia

The Sunnyside of Spencer Butte: The Saga of the Smoking Chimney

The Sunnyside of Spencer Butte: The Saga of Big Oak Stables

The Sunnyside of Spencer Butte: A Fishy Story

The Sunnyside of Spencer Butte: A Different Peace

The Sunnyside of Spencer Butte: Hal and the Mountain

The Sunnyside of Spencer Butte: A Rogue River Adventure

Sunnyside of Spencer Butte: Obituary for a Country Cat

The Sunnyside of Spencer Butte: The Cortesia Sanctuary

The Sunnyside of Spencer Butte: The Tree and Me and Lady Slippers

The Sunnyside of Spencer Butte: Cranberries

The Sunnyside of Spencer Butte: Endurance Riding

The Sunnyside of Spencer Butte: Butterflies and Community Development

and The Sunnyside of Spencer Butte: The Last Gift.

See more of Lois Barton's articles in West By Northwest.org online magazine's archives:

Visit the Heron Rookery

Sauerkraut and All That

Charlotte's Overdose - Just who is Charlotte and what did she take?

The Midwife–The midnight call awoke an unusual midwife.

The Mystery of Fox Hollow - Fact and fiction meet in this story of the origins of Faith Rock.

Trees, Tame Trees and Squirrel.

Responses

No responses.


Leave a Reply

Name
Email (Will not be published.)
What is 3 + 7? (To help prevent automated spammers.)